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Junior League Football Team Made Special Need Boy The Weekend Honorary Captain

Fox Lake’s Grant Jr. Bulldogs made seven-year-old Bryson Jenkins happy by making him their honorary captain for the weekend game. The junior league football team even made Bryson score a touchdown, and the crowd goes wild as they chant his name. Michael Jenkins, Bryson’s father, accompanied his son to the game. He said, “It was really, really an experience.”

It might be Bryson’s greatest moment of his life so far. Just last year when Bryson took his first steps with assistance. Bryson’s mother, Brittany Jenkins, said, “Until last year, he wasn’t able to walk at all.” Several months after that, the boy became a football captain, and the experience was terrific.

Bryson had a stroke when he’s still a baby, and that gave him epilepsy and cerebral palsy. The boy loves football, so the memory will stick with him, and will motivate him that he can do great things in life.

Bryson prepared for the momentous game because he suited up in his custom-made jersey. Britanny said, “They asked if Bryson would want to go through the banner with them as they entered the field. Bryson just… I mean, the look on his face. He was smiling from ear to ear. He was just soaking up the attention.”

Michael and his son sat right on the sideline while cradling a football throughout the game. Just 46 seconds left on the game when Bryson’s jersey number was called. The crowd went wild as Michael help Bryson score the touchdown.

Grant Jr. Bulldogs coach Danny Gallina said, “It was the Gronk spike at the end and the first pump. You could tell the excitement. The football players started jumping, and he’s smiling and laughing. He was part of us that day, and he was with us.”

Michael expressed, “It was an incredible moment that I got to share with him. It was amazing.”

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